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About John Henry Newman

Newman to Converts: An Existential Ecclesiology

    Strange as this may appear, the instructions Newman gave in letters to prospective converts have not yet formed the subject of a thorough inquiry. This in spite of some salient facts: thirty or so such persons were involved over several decades; the total length of those instructions would amount to six to seven hundred pages if printed together; and, finally, the material has been in print for now over a quarter of a century. If one considers the wealth of publications on Newman during that time, the neglect of the topic may be far from unintentional. Surely, in an age of an ecumenism often heedless of basic and unchangeable parameters, Newman's insistence on the grievous sin of staying in schism, to say nothing of the sin of plain heresies, can hardly be attractive. In an age of dubious innovations in Catholic ecclesiology, very uncomfortable should appear to its practitioners Newman's emphasis on such "conservative" notions as the obviousness of the four Notes of the Church, let alone of a Church which, in his eyes, was the One True Fold of salvation. What he stressed to prospective converts constitutes the pylons of a truly existential ecclesiology, simply because for Newman, both in his own case and in the case of others, the duty of belonging to that One True Fold was the matter of a choice between eternal life and death, the most existential choice available to man.
    This book is a theological blockbuster. According to the Catholic Herald (London) Jaki's book opens a Pandora box. It surely shakes to its foundations much of the recent literature on Newman.
    The One True Fold: Newman and His Converts, a booklet that deals briefly with the same argument can be found here.
    Three books by John Beaumont who deal with conversions to Catholicism can be found here.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-18-6  •  xii + 529 pages  •  softcover  •  $24



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Newman's Challenge

    This penetrating interpretation of the thought of John Henry Cardinal Newman (1801-1890) confronts a variety of common misperceptions of the famous English churchman, especially those that diminish Newman's deep appreciation of the supernatural. As Stanley Jaki writes, "Newman's chief challenge today, as in his times, aims at the defense of the supernatural." In this volume Jaki shows that such a defense was, for Newman, far more than a simple intellectual enterprise: for him the supernatural was above all a spiritual challenge of the profoundest sort. In the first chapter of the book, Jaki provides an overview of the challenge that Newman set for himself as well as for the Church. The rest of the book unfolds this challenge across a dozen key topics drawn from Newman's writings. Jaki shows that much as the topics of original sin, angels, miracles, Anglo-Catholicism, conversion, and the papacy may differ from those of assent, science, evolution, and history, they all bespeak Newman's total engagement with the concretely given supernatural.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 0-8028-4395-6  •  viii + 321 pages  •  softcover  •  $10



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The Church of England as Viewed by Newman

    Newman became a Catholic because he had to revise drastically the view he championed as a Tractarian about the Church of England. It was a most painful experience for him to recognize that the Church of England was a mere human contrivance, with no claim whatsoever to be considered a Church. As a Catholic, Newman presented, both in his books and in correspondence, this view of his on the Church of England with a stunning consistency. While what he said in his books was public knowledge, the corresponding material in his letters, which provide two-thirds of the material presented in this book, failed to become the subject of a comprehensive study. This book aims at filling that void, in testimony to the weight which Newman's views have come to carry. At a time when the Church of England sinks into an abyss morally, there should be a prophetic touch to a specific foreboding of Newman. He found it possible that the Church of England would eventually become an enemy of Truth. Already as an Anglican Newman rejected the notion that unity should be pursued at the price of Truth. This should seem most portentous for these ecumenical times in which some Catholics look for enlightenment in the writings of the Anglican Newman. No small value should be seen in the ecclesiological framework within which Newman took a strongly negative view of the validity of Anglican orders.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-38-0  •  viii + 364 pages  •  softcover  •  $20



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Apologetics as Meant by Newman

    A generation ago apologetics was declared to be in a state of flux. Thirty years later this appraisal, so ominous in its implications, was still held. Whatever the merit of the recent claim that apologetics witnesses a rebirth, this does not seem to take place along lines set forth by Newman. The gist of apologetics as Newman meant it, lies in a vivid awareness of the enormity of sin as an offense against a most holy God. In that awareness does Newman see the only logical source of a vivid religion. He was anything but an "interiorist" apologist, productive of rhetorical flourish about the "positive" aspects of faith experience. In this his major inquiry into Newman's thought, the author first analyzes the Grammar of Assent, which has become the victim of Newmanists who delight in logic chopping, but show no interest in Newman's message about sin and deliverance from it. Next comes a presentation of Newman's ideas on the four Notes of the Church, surely a stepchild of the "new" ecumenical apologetics. Finally such topics, all very dear to Newman, are taken up as doctrinal development, Church and culture, and Catholic universities - all of them presented with no apologies whatsoever.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-49-6  •  xv + 419 pages  •  softcover  •  $28



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Neo-Arianism as Foreseen by Newman

    Until recently scholars on Arianism rightly saw Arius and Athanasius, the legendary protagonists in a gigantic confrontation, as the respective embodiments of vice and virtue. The previous century and a half witnessed the emergence of a vast literature on Arianism which has been increasingly favorable to Arius. It is against this development that one would best appreciate Newman's first major book, The Arians of the Fourth Century, or simply The Arians. In addition to being a very scholarly work, The Arians is also most original. It presents the Arian dispute as a moral contestation about the pivotal Christian doctrine, the Incarnation of the Son of God, the Savior of mankind. The first six chapters of this book deal with the making and contents of The Arians. The last four chapters present its reception or rather shameful slighting and neglect. The dislike shown toward The Arians is easily understood if one considers that Newman often refers to the Incarnation as "the Sacred Mystery." No similar touch in many new christological publications, Protestant and even Catholic, all suggestive, in various degrees, of Arianizing trends. To his credit, Newman foresaw their coming.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 0-9774826-6-9  •  vi + 255 pages  •  softcover  •  $16



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Justification as Argued by Newman

    While the Anglican Newman's volumes of Sermons were avidly read, they were not discussed. Though not always an easy reading, the Lectures on Justification were much disputed and mostly opposed by Anglicans. The reason for this difference is simple. In the Lectures Newman argued in a rigorous way, though he also exhorted. In the Sermons he exhorted without arguing much. Into the Sermons any sincere and devout Anglican could read his deepest aspirations, but on reading the Lectures he had to reconsider at almost every step the notion Anglicanism inherited from Luther about merit as belonging solely to Christ. But since Newman argued, and always with an eye on Luther, on behalf of real sanctification through grace and sacraments, it was not difficult to see that the Lectures were an unwitting plea in support of Rome's stance on the subject. In other words Newman's relentless pursuit in theory and practice of the supernatural lead him inevitably to Rome, which at least a few suspected when the Lectures were published in April 1838. For a long time neglected, the Lectures drifted again into Catholic and Protestant theological focus in recent decades, though time and again at the price of misconstructing what Newman argued. So much for the timeliness of this book.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 978-0-9790577-4-8  •  viii + 286 pages  •  $22



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