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Theology

Why the Question: Is there a God?

    The existence of God has been the topic of countless essays, books, and debates. Proofs have been offered, proofs have been questioned, proofs have been rejected. Many banished God from the scene. Some declared Him dead, still others duly buried Him. Still it remains impossible to exorcise the question: Is there a God?
    Throughout this book the author insists that before one looks for a formal proof of the existence of God, one has to focus on the reasons why the question—Is there a God?—keeps challenging any honest mind and decent heart.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-22-4  •  vii + 71 pages  •  softcover  •  $5



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Why the Question: Is There a Soul?

    Modern man has for some time been in a desperate search for his very soul and is unable to find it. Obviously there has to be something very defective in modem man's method of searching for his soul. The frustration results in despair about one's very self, or about an abiding personal purpose that survives as a personal consciousness one's greatest frustration which is bodily death. Instead of giving formal proofs of the existence of an immortal, individual human soul, the book presents the promptings that keep the human being to see in himself or herself something infinitely more than a lump of matter, however intricate.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-23-2     vii + 68 pages     $5



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Why Believe in Jesus?

    Jesus is history's most gigantic phenomenon which, at least in recent times, has been studiedly ignored by the arbiters of public opinion. While Jews are an overwhelming choice for topic, it has become taboo to refer, in connection with them, to Jesus, though very much a Jew. Jesus can be understood only as the Jesus of the Jews, the Jesus of the Church, and the Jesus of the saints. This book, the text of three lectures, develops those three themes with an emphasis on their connection. Once connected, those three topics make most instructive the question: Why believe in Jesus?

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-27-5  •  viii + 79 pages  •  $5



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Why Believe in the Church?

    The strange survival value of the Catholic Church has intrigued many attentive minds that have been watching it from the outside. The Church appeared to them very different indeed from any other institution in human history.
    While the Catholic Church asserts itself to be very different, it does so in a coherent way, and has done so steadily for now two thousand years. Furthermore it claims that its difference from anything else is rooted in that greatest of all differences which is the difference of the supernatural from the merely natural. The differences of the Church are set forth as expressive of its four great notes: unity, catholicity, apostolicity, and sanctity.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-24-0  •  vii + 74 pages  •  softcover  •  $5



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Why the Mass?

    The Mass is the most enduring, the most unparalleled rite in religious history. This fact deserves that ever new efforts be made to bring out the reasons for this unique reality. The principal reason is, of course, the reality of Jesus, and the fact that the institution of the Mass at the Last Supper was the overriding aim of his life. All of Jesus' deeds, all his teaching served the purpose of preparing the Apostles for the significance of that Supper, and indirectly all those who believed in him and were to believe them. The Apostles and their successors have always held indeed for their principal mission the re-enacting of what Jesus did at the Last Supper. As to the faithful, they showed from the start a visceral hunger for the food which the re-enactment of that Supper can alone secure. Such are the three main themes set forth in the three chapters of this book. It echoes what a non-Catholic British politician put, a hundred years ago, in words of inimitable conciseness, namely, that for Catholics "it is the mass that counts."

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-33-5  •  viii + 76 pages  •  softcover  •  $5



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Original Sin?

    The Church's teaching about original sin is easily the most resented tenet of all her message. In this age of overoptimism fueled by the marvels of technology, trendy theologians are especially ashamed of that tenet. They do everything to make it disappear from the faithful's consciousness. A very strange effort, because the same theologians claim to be empirical. Yet no dogma of the Church has so much empirical support as the dogma of original sin. Man, as the first chapter shows, appears to be be caught in wars with others and himself, to the point of showing itself to be an almost mortally wounded being. The second chapter presents the fact that the Pharisees, who thought themselves to be perfect, rejected Jesus, God's most original remedy to wounded man. A major lesson on behalf of original sin can be found also in the circumstances in which original sin obtained its first dogmatic formulation. Such is the topic of the third chapter. In brief, the book aims at answering the sceptical question: Original sin?

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-34-8  •  viii + 77 pages  •  softcover   •  $5



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Advent and Science

    In the Liturgical Year Advent is a season with a special charm that has a profound grip on the faithful. The reason of that charm is far deeper than a matter of sentiments about either the past or the future. During Advent the faithful are called to reflection, which is an act of the present that conjures up the past as well as the future. But these three - the present, the past, and the future - have a profound significance also for science. In this book the author probes into the relation of science and religion by portraying their respective messages about those three parameters of time, this most mysterious predicament of human existence, individual and social.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-13-5   •   vii + 89 pages   •   softcover   •   $9



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The Virgin Birth
and
the Birth of Science

    If Christ can be claimed to be The Savior of Science (the title of one of this author's books), then logic calls for a step to be made in the same sense from the Son to his Mother. Such is the gist of this essay by a world-renowned Catholic historian of science whom Pope John Paul II has named honorary member of the Pontifical Academy of Science. The author's lucid reasoning is given a graphic touch by his use of William Blake's little known watercolors and oil paintings about the Nativity, the Adoration of the Magi, and the Flight to Egypt—reproduced in color. An insightful and inspirational reading for Christmas in this age of science.

By Fr. Stanley L. Jaki

ISBN 1-892548-C3-8  •  32 pages  •  softcover  •  $3



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